Saturday, August 24, 2019
Home » Tag Archives: human interaction

Tag Archives: human interaction

New robot tries to hold our interest

Humanoids such as Hiro, above, would be better at engaging humans if they noticed when we weren't interested and adjusted the conversation accordingly. (Photo credit: Elhuyar Fundazioa)

Humans communicate using words and body language. When we sense the other person is distracted, we change the course of our conversation and our actions to regain their attention. Most robots, however, use monologue mechanisms even when engaging in dialogue with a person: they continue speaking in …

Read More »

Flawed Robots are Better Equipped to Build Relationships with Humans

MARC the 3D printed robot. MARC the 3D printed robot. (Photo courtesy of the University of London.)

Humans are less likely to form successful working relationships with interactive robots if they are programmed to be too perfect, new research reveals. Interactive or ‘companion’ robots are increasingly used to support caregivers for elderly people and for children with autism, Asperger syndrome or attachment disorder, …

Read More »

Your Robot’s Manners Matter

Research by Ohad Inbar (left) and Joachim Meyer found that people were less influenced by the perceived age and gender of a humanoid. Politeness mattered most, in terms of first impressions. (Photo credit: Tel Aviv University)

Robots are increasingly considered for use in highly tense civilian encounters to minimize person-to-person contact and danger to peacekeeping personnel. Trust, along with physical qualities and cultural considerations, is an essential factor in the effectiveness of these robotic peacekeepers. New research that will be presented at …

Read More »

Nao Co-Writer Teaches Handwriting by Feigning Ignorance

A new research project seeks to help students struggling with handwriting by empowering them to teach a Nao robot. (Photo credit: EPFL.)

Children struggling with handwriting might one day benefit from a research project involving the Nao robot. The Nao Co-Writer interacts with the child using a tablet. First the child makes the word using magnetic letters. Next, the robot writes the word on the tablet — but somewhat badly. …

Read More »