Thursday, April 25, 2019
Home » Tag Archives: biomimicry

Tag Archives: biomimicry

Dive of the RoboBee

The Harvard RoboBee, designed in Wood's lab, is a microrobot, smaller than a paperclip, that flies and hovers like an insect, flapping its tiny, nearly invisible wings 120 times per second. (Photo credit: Harvard Microrobotics Lab.)

In 1939, a Russian engineer proposed a “flying submarine” — a vehicle that can seamlessly transition from air to water and back again. While it may sound like something out of a James Bond film, engineers have been trying to design functional aerial-aquatic vehicles for decades …

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Bio-inspired robotic finger looks, feels and works like the real thing

The finger was placed under the manipulandum while it was locked to measure the maximum force each SMA actuator was capable of applying. (b) The manipulandum was subsequently unlocked and a spring was placed between the two sides to measure the force and displacement of the finger with a compliant object. (Photo credit: FAU)

Inspired by both nature and biology, Erik Engeberg of Florida Atlantic University has designed a novel robotic finger that looks and feels like the real thing. The robotic finger uses shape memory alloy (SMA), a 3D CAD model of a human finger, a 3D printer, and a unique thermal …

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Designing Robots that Move Easily Over Loose Sand

Sceloporus olivaceus moves through test bed. (Photo credt: Qian, Zhang, Horff, Umbanhowar, Full, Goldman)

Soft steps and large feet allow animals and robots to maintain high speeds on loose soil and sand. These findings, reported recently in Bioinspiration & Biomechanics, offer a new insight into how animals respond to different terrain, and how robots can learn from them. The researchers, based …

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Gaining Insight on Robotic Vision From Insects

University of Adelaide Ph.D. student Zahra Bagheri and supervisor Professor Benjamin Cazzolato with a vision system that uses algorithms based on insect vision. (Photo credit: University of Adelaide.)

A new research project seeks to improve robot vision by applying findings from research on insect and human sight. As a part of their work, the researchers built a virtual reality simulation, in which an artificial intelligence system pursued an object. The findings were recently published …

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Robot Roach Moves Super Fast on Tiny Fiberglass Legs

The X2-VelociRoACH moves fast by increasing the frequency of its strides while keeping stride length consistent. (Photo credit: UC Berkeley.)

A new robot called the X2-VelociRoACH is setting land-speed records for small, legged robots. The bot, which weighs in at 54 grams, can run up to 4.9 m/s with stride frequencies up to 45 Hz. Built by researchers at UC Berkeley’s Biomimetic Millisystems Lab, the X2 …

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Robot Bat Glides and Jumps With Ease

MultiMo-Bat researcher Matthew Woodward stands still while his creation jumps over his head. The images of the robot in it's various stages of locomotion were taken with a high-speed video camera. Photo courtesy of Matthew Woodward.

A new robot inspired by the vampire bat can jump and glide efficiently, reaching heights of more than 9 feet. The robot, called MultiMo-Bat, was designed to explore new strategies for integrating multiple modes of mobility and enhance the performance of small-scale robotic systems. “Current works …

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Cheap, Swarming Research Robots

Colias robots provids a platform for researchers who want to study swarming but don't have a lot of money to spend on robots. Photo courtesy of University of Lincoln.

Researchers at the University of Lincoln, UK, and the Tsinghua University in China have developed an inexpensive robot called Colias, that they say is ideal for studying applications involving teams of robots working together. Named after a genus of butterfly, the robots are said to be able to …

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Combining a Human Brain with Rat Eyes for Better Navigation

Michael Milford with one of the robots he plans to use with his human-rat hybrid navigation system. Photo Courtesy of Queensland University of Technology.

Roboticists often look to the living world for guidance on locomotion. There are countless robots designed to move like animals: some run like cheetahs, others slither like snakes, and a few even fly like insects. Michael Milford thinks roboticists should consider a two-pronged, biomimetic approach to …

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