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Robotic Garden: Part II Making It Marketable

E D U   B O T S

SHAPING THE FUTURE OF ROBOTICS

EDU Building Code Skills and Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition-4Massachusetts Institute Of Technology

Cambridge, MA

Building Code Skills In A Robotic Garden, by Lindsay Sanneman

EDU Building Code Skills and Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition-1
Lindsay Sanneman, Software Engineer, Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

 

In the previous edition of EduBots, we introduced MIT’s Distributed Robot Garden System, which is both a test bed for distributed algorithms and a platform for computer science education for middle school and high school-aged students. The MIT team worked for a year to develop the robotic garden with over 100 robot flowers that can be programmed to light up, change colors, and open and close their petals.

028-7In trials, students using the robotic garden provided positive feedback and were excited not only about the algorithms they saw depicted through the light-up flowers, but also about how the garden is programmed using Arduino microcontrollers.

The team is currently taking the next step, developing a new version of the garden that will be more accessible to schools—affordable and more portable. Stay tuned for the next edition of EduBots, when we’ll report on this all-important step.

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