Monday, September 25, 2017
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Packbot Explorer

IROBOT

www.irobot.com

(781) 418-3135

The iRobot PackBot® Explorer is a new addition to iRobot’s combat-proven line of PackBot robots. It includes three cameras and greater flexibility to customize its abilities with a variety of sensors and other tools. iRobot’s PackBot robots are used on dozens of missions every day in Iraq and Afghanistan to safely identify and dispose of improvised explosive devices and search buildings and caves for the presence of hostile forces. In addition to the new Explorer model, the PackBot line of robots includes the more advanced PackBot Explosive Ordnance Device (EOD) bomb disposal robot and the PackBot Scout reconnaissance robot. Shown here are early demonstration prototypes and more advanced models.

PackBot Explorer’s articulating head and camera can rise 18 inches off of the platform, giving soldiers and first responders excellent situational awareness, so they know what to expect and can decide how to respond. It is designed to quickly and efficiently integrate a wide range of third-party payloads, sensors and systems, including an electro-optical infrared thermal camera and laser pointer. PackBot Explorer can be carried and deployed by one person. Its rugged, shock-resistant chassis can survive submersion in water up to two meters deep. It can climb stairs and maneuver rough terrain including rocks, mud, snow and gravel at up to 8 kilometers per hour. PackBot Explorer features six additional ports for modular payloads such as optics and extra batteries, as well as multiple embedded sensors including a Global Positioning System receiver, electronic compass, absolute orientation sensors and motor temperature sensors.

“iRobot PackBot robots have proven to be invaluable lifesaving tools on the battlefield,” said Vice Admiral Joe Dyer (U.S. Navy, Ret.), executive vice president and general manager, iRobot Government & Industrial Robots division. “The new PackBot Explorer allows soldiers and first responders to better see and address threats before entering the risk zone.”